Archives for posts with tag: people change

I was chatting with an old colleague the other day, they being from the comms side of things, and we discussed, among other things, difficulties we had experienced getting organisations to put out employee surveys.
Actually doing employees surveys is now so par for the course I’m amazed when I come across organisations that are still afraid to ask, but it seems that sometimes leaders just don’t think it’s the right time. My chum and I went through a few of the excuses we had come up against over the years – there were a few, but here’s the top 5:

  • We know what they think anyway
  • Everyone is miserable so why bother asking
  • Money’s tight, this is a nice to have not a necessity
  • We’re going through too much change, so no point asking until things get settled
  • It’s just an excuse for people to have a whinge

Let’s have a look at these in detail, shall we?

“We know what they think anyway” Really? Really? Everyone in the whole organisation? Hmmm… Now, I always say that if a team leader is surprised by the survey results for their team, then they aren’t really leading that team, but that’s for another blog, another time.

But if you’re the CEO or other senior leader in any organisation of more than, say 50 or so people, then chances are you aren’t close enough to people to really know what they say. And, chances are, if you are, and you do go out and about, visiting the troops and ask people how things are, they might, when  put on the spot, tell you what they think you want to hear. An anonymous survey may give them chance to say what they really feel, which may be something different.

“Everyone is miserable so why bother asking” A classic “how do you know if you don’t ask”. I worked with an organisation who took this approach once, and I worked with a group of change champions across the business, speaking to them on a pretty regular basis on how things were; the picture was far more mixed than senior leaders thought. What came through, after a bit of digging, was that lots of people were very role engaged – they loved doing their job, got a lot of fulfilment from it, took meaning and satisfaction from doing their best and doing it well – and where they had the autonomy and authority to do those jobs, they were very happy. What they lacked, on the whole, was engagement with the organisation as a whole.

Even if you think you know that everyone is unhappy, and they are, it’s handy to have that in writing, with evidence, so that you can do something about it. After all, aa survey shouldn’t just tell you how people are feeling, it should give you some insight into why they are feeling that way. Again, we can discuss further in another blog.

“Money’s tight, this is a nice to have not a necessity” I know the recession is over and things are on the up – but I’m not sure that is really felt out there in the big wide world, you know? Anyway, money is tight, especially in the public sector, and likely to remain so, so this excuse will be in favour for a while to come. What I say is, can you afford not to? Disengaged employees are more likely to cost your organisation a lot more in absence, lack of productivity, poor quality work, mistakes etc than the cost of a basic survey – for some facts, check this. Bottom line for your bottom line: engagement = mo’ money.

“We’re going through too much change, so no point asking until things get settled”. Two things: (a) when aren’t you going through change and (b) that is exactly the time you need to know how people are thinking and feeling: the success (or failure) of the change depends on it, believe me. Again, another blog (in fact, I feel a series coming on…) for more, but if people aren’t engaged with the change, it’s unlikely to deliver the benefits you hope to get.

“It’s just an excuse for people to have a whinge” Guess what? They’re going to whinge anyway, probably at home, down the pub, at the water cooler, to their colleagues; why not give them a platform to do so, and then do something about it. That way, they might stop whinging.

I may revisit these excuses in more detail and real life examples in future blogs, but, in the mean time, have a think: are you putting off your staff survey? If so, why? If you have another excuse, let me know and I’ll explain why that’s a bad idea too…

In recent blogs I have been banging on about change management, as I recently took a project management course in order to polish up my skills and knowledge and that.

change2

I was struck, as I was when I did my first PM course (many years ago) that there is a lot on tools, techniques and skills around planning, organisation, managing issues and risks and all that, the people side of things seemed a bit glossed over. Well, there was plenty about managing key stakeholders – even admitting that if two stakeholders have conflicting requirements then things can get tricky.

There was also, to be fair, stuff about estimating resource  and a whole chapter in the handbook about Project Human Resource Management. My interest was piqued at this, and I read on, and there was plenty of stuff about recruiting and managing your project team, none of which was objectionable in any way. I especially enjoyed the lengthy section on the kinds of organisational charts you could use, and the two sentences indicating that Organizational Theory (forgive the Z) could come in handy.

There was a section on team-building and the importance of reward (and another learning unit on not taking bribes) and, again, nothing actually wrong with it. There was a sentence saying that leadership was “an important skill”, and that decision makign should be effective.

The next chapter was on communication, with much on managing stakeholder expectations and reporting progress, issues and risks in a timely fashion. Again, all good stuff and rightly good practice for any project management professional.

What was missing, however, was a sense that when the changes are implemented into the organisation then people are going to be impacted by that change, and for any change to be effective, the people impacted need to be ready, willing and able to make that change actually happen in the real world.

I have worked with change managers for many, many years and they are, like most groups, a pleasingly diverse lot, with a range of personalities and approaches to their given field. Most of them were very good with their Gantt charts, flow diagrams and structure charts, their issue logs and risk management matrices. Very few of them were good with the concept of change happening through people.

Why this is has occupied my thoughts often, and I found myself musing on it again as I printed off my Certificate of Mastery and before logging onto my Six Sigma course (expect a very similar blog about process improvement in the coming weeks, people).

My thoughts are this: charts, diagrams, logs and matrices are easy. They sit there, they are logical and ordered, they do what they are meant to do, they have clear terms of reference and clear roles within the project, they are fit for purpose. Process, too, is easy. You know what’s what, it happens in order and processes can be managed.

People, on the other hand, are rarely any of these things. They are difficult, they are illogical, they have emotions and they are fickle and unpredictable. A project plan moves neatly as a task is completed and a green on target square on the plan changes to a nice, neat black completed one. People can, and usually do, resist change. They have their own agendas, they want things to happen to make their life easier and if your project plan isn’t going to deliver that, then it’s not likely to deliver what you want it to, either.

What Project Management courses don’t teach you, in my experience, is this wider, all-encompassing sense of the term “stakeholder management”. Stakeholders are usually seen as the important people you need to get onside in order for things to happen, or at least know how to outflank the other important people who don’t want it to happen.

Stakeholders should include the less important people; the people on the shop floor who have to make whatever change you are managing into an experience in their daily lives – and even an experience for their customers.

I think I have mentioned before a piece of systems change I heard about which won awards for the success of its implementation at a posh black-tie IT bunfight, but resulted in poorer customer service and lower employee engagement. When that’s award winning performance, you have to question the criteria for which those awards were awarded, do you not?

Thinking about the impact on people of change is a simple thing to do, it just requires an understanding of where the people are at currently, what the likely impact of the changes are going to be be, and how they will react. Local leadership should be able to fill in those blanks pretty easily, shouldn’t they? (If the answer to that is “no”, then you have bigger issues than the colour-coding on your issue logs to worry about, believe me).

So, have a think: how does change happen in your organisation? Is it by the book? And does that deliver what you need? Could engaging with the people you are expecting to make this change happen more meaningfully at the outset help things go more smoothly? (Hint, yes it almost certainly could). Do your project people think about the process or what the outcome needs to be? And do they realise that for any outcomes to be delivered requires the people implementing it, not the most immaculate project plan ever drafted? Have a think.